The grandson of the designer of Hitler's bunker built Saddam Hussein's bunker. Apparently it runs in the family!

The grandson of the designer of Hitler's bunker built Saddam Hussein's bunker. Apparently it runs in the family!

Lots of people share their craft with their son or daughter in an attempt to pass on their legacy and the skill that they practice.


However, not many pass on the trade of building bunkers for infamous public enemies. Such appears to be the legacy of the woman who designed Adolf Hitler's bunker.Two generations later, her grandson would go on to be the designer of Saddam Hussein's bunker.


One can only guess how a family gets in such a business, but there is no guesswork in regards to why the grandson was asked to build the bunker. Simply put: He was good at his job. Massive bombs created for the purpose of reaching and tearing apart underground bunkers were unable to even scratch the man's creation.


Layers of concrete in its construction were put in place above the bunker for the purpose of 'tricking' any bunker busting bombs that 'detect' the amount of levels or floors that it crashes through before it explodes. The palace above the bunker was almost completely mutilated by the explosions, showing just how defensible the designer's layout turned out to be.


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Scientists can now prove that we are all living in the past! Find out what the brain does to make sense of our world

Scientists can now prove that we are all living in the past! Find out what the brain does to make sense of our world

Our brains are amazing organs! They go through a lot of effort to make everything we perceive seem fluent so that we can make sense of it all. The truth is things are not at all what they seem, and we are all actually living in the past!


David Eagleman of the Baylor College of Medicine demonstrated that we are all living in the past by using several visual illusions to prove the point. One of them is the flash-lag effect. A light flashes when an object moves past it, but we don’t see the two as coincident; there appears to be a slight delay between the two events.


Our consciousness lags 80 milliseconds behind actual events. “When you think an event occurs it has already happened,” Eagleman said. The reason is because our brains try to reconstruct events that happen and stimuli that occur at different times, in a cohesive way so that we can have a cohesive picture of the world around us.


But sometimes the brain just can’t wait. If a hand-clapper is less than 30 meters away, you hear and see the clap happen simultaneously, but one meter further and the sound arrives more than 80 milliseconds later than the light, and the brain no longer matches what you see and hear.


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Matt LeBlanc was on his last $11 when he auditioned to play Joey on Friends!

Matt LeBlanc was on his last $11 when he auditioned to play Joey on Friends!

Matt LeBlanc started off his career in a bunch of well-known commercials in the late 1980s. He was in a Heinz, a Levi's, and a Coca-Cola commercial. Then he got a couple of gigs on TV shows in 1988 through 1991. They either made it through one full season and were nixed or they didn't even make it through a whole season before being cancelled.


He made it into several music videos, too, including in a Jon Bon Jovi and an Alanis Morissette where he played her boyfriend. He was almost always cast as an Italian. In reality he is of Dutch, French, English, Irish, and Italian descent. In 1994, he auditioned for a little show called Friends as Joey Tribbiani.


He had only $11 in his pocket at the time and he luckily landed the job. After he was given his first paycheck the first thing he did was buy himself a hot meal. The show did him and his cast members well and brought him great fame. He played Joey Tribbiani for the next 12 years and even got a spin-off show called Joey after Friends ended. He was in a couple movies in the 2000s and finally was cast as himself in a TV show in 2013.


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Babies can be taught sign language to express their needs before they learn to speak!

Babies can be taught sign language to express their needs before they learn to speak!

After performing extensive studies on the topic, Dr. Susan W. Goodwyn of California State University and Dr. Linda P. Acredolo of the University of California have found that babies who learn sign language before speech developed more advanced language skills and engaged in more complex social interactions than children who learned to communicate through speech alone.


These findings lay a lot of fears to rest that teaching babies sign language will interfere with their ability to learn speech. It is obviously recommended that parents speak to the child while signing so that the child can understand that the word and the sign represent the same concept.


According to the Web site ‘Signing With Your Baby’, children can be taught sign language from the age of six months old. Children can cope with a vocabulary of about twelve sign words in the beginning. As soon as children understand the significance of signs, they will be eager to learn signs for everything around them.


Many parents teach their babies need-based signs. This could greatly reduce frustration in both the baby and the parents. Common need-based signs include "more," "eat" or "drink." It is very useful if a child can communicate its needs before it has mastered speech.


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After an amphetamine binge, a 22-year-old medical student suddenly had the same acute sense of smell as a dog!

After an amphetamine binge, a 22-year-old medical student suddenly had the same acute sense of smell as a dog!

Neurologist Dr. Oliver Sacks wrote a book titled ‘The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat and Other Clinical Tales’. In it, he describes the case histories of some of his most interesting patients in short essays. The book was published in 1985 and in it there is a story titled ‘The Dog Beneath the Skin’.


In that story, Sacks describes meeting a 22-year-old medical student who, after an amphetamine binge, dreamed he was a dog and experienced, in his dream, all the unimaginable smells that dogs smell every day. When the student woke up he realized that the ability was not gone and he still had the acute sensory abilities of a dog!


For the next three weeks the man could recognize people he knew by their smell. His world was suddenly much enhanced and he found that there was “a whole aesthetic, a whole judgment, a whole new significance, which surrounded him,” Sacks wrote. “It was a world overwhelmingly concrete, of particulars, a world overwhelming in immediacy, in immediate significance,” the student reported. After three weeks it was gone.


Many years later, Sacks revealed that the student he named Stephen D, was in fact, himself and that it was his personal experience he had described in his book!


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An explosion in France was so loud, it was heard in London!

An explosion in France was so loud, it was heard in London!

In common use, the word noise means any unwanted sound. Noises have different volume levels, and logic can pretty much explain that the loudest the noise, the more “I want to rip my ears off” feeling will increase.


Ever wondered what’s the loudest noise that mankind has ever heard?


On July 1 of 1916, at the Battle of the Somme, a charge of 60,000 lbs. Of explosives was detonated creating a crater that was 300 feet across and 90 feet deep.


The explosion, which occurred in France, could be heard as far away as London and was the loudest man made sound in history at the time.


Apparently there has been a louder noise, but this is one that Europe will surely never forget.


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There's a sea-slug that eats the venomous Portuguese man o' war. What does it do with the poison?

There's a sea-slug that eats the venomous Portuguese man o' war. What does it do with the poison?

It’s no secret that some species of animals have developed incredible means of survival. The diversity of life in the ocean alone is difficult to fathom. Hence, there always seems to be an inexhaustible supply of interesting facts to learn about marine biology, and the blue glaucus (Glaucus atlanticus) is a perfect case in point.


Even though it is often mistaken for a jellyfish, the blue glaucus is distinct in a number of ways. This sea slug characteristically floats upside down near the surface of the water. How do they manage to do it? By swallowing air, which is then stored in their stomachs, giving them the ability to float.


That’s not even their most unusual quality. They survive mainly by eating hydrozoans (tiny animals living in salt water), including the Portuguese man o’ war . . . even the stings! In fact, not only do the stings provide sustenance for the blue glaucus, but they use the poison for their own defense.


For obvious reasons, this species has been of serious interest to scientists for as long as they have been known. They were first discovered by Westerners on Captain Cook’s second voyage to the Pacific. Scientists who accompanied him on his journey first described the animal in 1777.


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The Nazis had a hidden base in North America that wasn't discovered until 1977!

The Nazis had a hidden base in North America that wasn't discovered until 1977!

In October of 1943 a German U-Boat arrived in Martin Bay, Labrador. Within 24 hours a weather station was set up a quarter mile inland. The station was given the codename “Kurt,” presumably after the meteorologist who manned the station, Dr. Kurt Sommermeyer.


The station only operated for about two weeks according to German records, and wasn’t discovered until 1977 by a team of archeologists. This was probably because of how far north Martin Bay is, making it quite isolated.


Setting up the station must have been a huge and tiring task as the equipment was extremely heavy. There were ten canisters that weighed around 220 lb. each, as well as other equipment for communications and other miscellaneous things.


All of this had to be unloaded from a submarine, taken to land in rubber dinghies and then carried a quarter mile inland over unfamiliar land... in the dark. There just isn’t much sunlight when you’re that far north in October. All the effort doesn’t really seem worth it seeing as how the station only operated for two weeks.


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The term "show your colors" comes from sailing—and from pirates and war! Hear the whole story

The term "show your colors" comes from sailing—and from pirates and war! Hear the whole story

When someone says they see your true colors, they mean they finally see the real you. But what are these colors we’re showing? How did that term come to be? Well, you have to go back many centuries to get the answer, but it’s there.


Back when traveling by boat was the main way to travel long distances, ships would fly flags with certain colors and designs that symbolized your intentions or what you were doing. There were flags for if you were arriving or leaving a port, for example.


Of course, this was often exploited. Pirates especially loved showing the wrong flag to get close to unsuspecting ships and only show their “true colors” when they were close enough to attack the ship.


Pirates weren’t the only ones to use false colors, though. In a battle one side might show up with the wrong colors to confuse their enemy and gain an element of surprise. They would only change to their real colors when it was too late for the enemy to react.


The term still means generally the same thing all these years later. It’s certainly interesting to see how terms get their origins and then keep their meaning when the origin is irrelevant.


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"Human intelligence may do more harm than good on an evolutionary scale" -Stephen Hawking. Why does he feel that way?

"Human intelligence may do more harm than good on an evolutionary scale" -Stephen Hawking. Why does he feel that way?

If only I had known this in high school, I could have used it as an excuse not to study. Stephen Hawking, delivering his famous lecture “Life in the Universe” in 1996, explained how we are entering into a new age of evolution and why intelligence may not be an evolutionary advantage to humans.


Hawking explains how biological evolution began very slowly through natural selection of random mutations. What he calls the “Darwinian phase” of evolution took approximately 3.5 billion years of slow and steady progress.


Next (now) we have entered into a phase of what Hawking calls “external transmission,” meaning we are not directed by the DNA inside of us but rather by the information outside of us. Language and particularly the recording of the written word beginning some 10,000 years ago, has allowed human progress to grow by leaps and bounds. Maybe too quickly for our own good.


Where this intelligence is dangerous is that we still have the same primitive instincts and aggressive impulses as we did in caveman days, only now we are cavemen with nuclear weapons and the scientific advancements to create genetically engineered viruses. “There is no time,” he says, “to wait for Darwinian evolution to make us more intelligent and better natured.”


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